Choosing an Executor for Your Will

Do you have any recommendations or tips for selecting an executor of a will? I am putting together my will and I want to make sure I know my options and choose someone who is capable of taking on this responsibility. 


An executor is the person or institution that will be in charge of administering your estate and carrying out your final wishes. Choosing an executor is one of the most important decisions when preparing a will.

A good executor can help ensure the prompt and accurate distribution of your possessions with minimal problems. Some of the required duties include: filing court papers to start the probate process; managing your estate's assets; using your estate's funds to pay debts, taxes and bills; handling details like terminating credit cards and providing notice of death to banks and government agencies, like the Social Security Administration and the U.S. Post Office; preparing and filing final income tax returns; and distributing assets to the beneficiaries named in the will.

Given all this responsibility, the ideal candidate should be someone who is honest, dependable, well-organized, good with paperwork and vigilant about meeting deadlines.

Whom to Choose


Most people's first inclination is to name a family member, especially a spouse or child, as executor. If, however, you do not have an obvious family member to choose, you may want to ask a trusted friend. Be sure to choose someone in good health and younger than you who will be able to carry out your plans.

If your executor of choice lives in a different state, you may want to talk to an attorney to see if your state's laws impose any special requirements. Some states require an out-of-state executor to be a family member or a beneficiary while others may require a bond to protect your heirs in case of mismanagement or the appointment of an in-state agent.

Also, keep in mind that if the person you choose needs help settling your estate, he or she can always call on an expert, like an attorney or tax accountant, to guide them through the process. If your executor chooses to do so, your estate will cover any costs involved.

If you don't have a friend or relative you feel comfortable selecting, you could name a third party executor like a bank, trust company or a professional who has experience administering estates. If you need help locating a professional, the National Association of Estate Planners and Councils and the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys have great resources and provide directories on their websites to help you select an executor.

Executor Fees


Often times, family members and close friends who are also beneficiaries will agree to serve as executor for free. But, if you opt for a third-party executor, your estate will have to pay the third-party's fee. Each state has laws that govern how an executor is paid – either based on a percentage of the estate, a flat fee or an hourly rate.

Get Approval


Make sure to ask the executor you have chosen if he or she is okay with serving as your executor before naming that individual in your will. Once you have made your choice, go over the financial details in your will with that person and let him or her know where you keep all your important documents and financial information.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published June 21, 2019

How to Protect Yourself from the Social Security Imposter Scam

I recently received a strange call from an individual claiming to be a Social Security employee. The caller informed me that my Social Security number had been suspended because it was involved in a crime. He then said that I needed to reactivate my social security number and secure my bank funds by withdrawing them and putting them on gift cards. Is this a scam?


Yes. It is actually known as the "Social Security imposter scam" and it is becoming a widespread problem in the U.S. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has received more than 76,000 reports about this growing scam in the past 12 months alone. With average losses of $1,500, this is quickly becoming a favorite scam among fraudsters.

The Social Security imposter scam usually begins with a call from someone claiming to be with the Social Security Administration. The caller informs the victim that his or her Social Security number (SSN) has been suspended because it was stolen or has been involved in a crime.

The phone call may be a robocaller with a message to "press 1" to speak with a fake support representative who then claims to be able to help reactivate the victim's SSN.

In a variation of this scam, the caller may also tell a victim that he or she qualifies for an increase in benefits. The caller will explain that all the victim needs to do is provide some information. Typically, these callers will ask several questions to get personal information that they can then use to steal the victims' identities or drain their bank accounts.

Because of numerous data breaches, these scammers may have access to accurate personal information — such as SSNs — that they can use to build trust and appear legitimate. Regardless, before concluding the scam, fraudsters will almost always request payment to "unfreeze" the SSN or to process the increase in benefits. The scammer may request payment via an unusual payment method, such as by gift card or some form of cryptocurrency, like Bitcoin.

These scams can be devastating. There are several steps you can take to protect yourself, and your loved ones, from falling victim to this scam:

Do not trust your caller ID: Scammers can make it look as if the Social Security Administration is calling and even use the agency's real number. If you receive an unexpected call from the Social Security Administration, do not answer it. Instead, call the Social Security Administration's customer service number at 800-772-1213 to see if they were actually trying to contact you.

Remember, Social Security will never suspend your number or call and demand money: If anyone tells you something different, you are being scammed.

Do not give out personal information: Never give out your Social Security number, bank information or other personal details to an unknown caller. If you already did, visit IdentityTheft.gov/SSA to find out what steps you can take to protect your credit and your identity.

Do not trust the caller just because they may know some of your personal information: It is most likely a scam if the person on the other end asks to confirm your information.

Talk about the experience: Those who have been targeted should alert friends and neighbors about the call to spread information and report the scam to the FTC at FTC.gov/complaint.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published June 14, 2019
Print

How to Choose and Use a Home Blood Pressure Monitor

I just found out I have stage 1 hypertension and my doctor recommended I get a home blood pressure monitor to keep an eye on it. Can you offer me any tips on choosing and using one? 


Everyone with elevated or high blood pressure – stage 1 (or 130/80) and higher – should consider getting a home blood pressure monitor. Home monitoring can help you keep tabs on your blood pressure in a comfortable setting. Plus, if you are taking medication, the monitor will make certain it is working and alert you to a health problem if one arises.

Home Monitors


The best type of home blood pressure monitors to purchase are electric/battery powered automatic arm monitors, which are more reliable than wrist or fingertip monitors. With an automatic arm monitor, you simply wrap the cuff around your biceps and, with the push of a button, the cuff automatically inflates and deflates, displaying your blood pressure reading in a matter of seconds.

Today, many monitors come with additional features like irregular heartbeat detection, a risk category indicator that tells you whether your blood pressure is in the high range, a data-averaging function that allows you to take multiple readings and get an overall average, multiple user memory that allows two or more users to save their readings and downloadable memory that lets you transmit your data to your computer or smartphone.

You can find these monitors at pharmacies, medical supply stores or online, and you do not need a prescription to buy one. Prices typically range between $40 and $100.

In most cases, original Medicare will not cover a home blood pressure monitor. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan or a private health insurance policy it is worth checking into because some plans may provide coverage.

How to Measure


After you buy a monitor, it is a good idea to take it to your doctor's office so he or she can check its accuracy and make sure you are using it properly. Here are some additional steps to follow to ensure you get accurate readings at home.
  • Relax: Do not exercise, smoke or drink caffeinated drinks or alcohol for at least 30 minutes before measuring. Sit quietly for at least five minutes before you take a measurement and remain quiet during the test.
  • Sit correctly: Sit with your back straight and supported (on a dining chair, rather than a sofa). Your feet should be flat on the floor and your legs should not be crossed. Your arm should be supported on a flat surface (such as a table) with the upper arm at heart level. Make sure the middle of the cuff is placed directly above the bend of the elbow. Check your monitor's instructions for an illustration.
  • Put the cuff directly on your bare skin: Putting it over clothes can raise your systolic (upper) number by up to 40 mmHg.
  • Measure at the same time every day: It is important to take the readings at the same time each day, such as in the morning and evening. It does not matter whether you do it before or after taking medication. Just be consistent.
  • Go to the bathroom: A full bladder can raise your systolic pressure by 10 to 15 mmHg.
  • Take multiple readings and record the results: Each time you measure, take two or three readings one minute apart and record the results by writing them down, or using an online tracker (see CCCtracker.com).
Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published June 7, 2019
Print
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Adaptive Gardening: Tips and Tools for Older Gardeners

Can you recommend some good tools and tips for senior gardeners? My 77-year-old mother loves to work in the garden but has been plagued by injuries over the past few years.


Aches, pains and injuries are common among older gardeners. Because gardening is a physical activity that often requires a lot of bending, stooping, squatting, kneeling, gripping and lifting, it can be extremely taxing on the body.

Back pain and knee injuries are most common among older gardeners, along with carpal tunnel syndrome and tennis elbow. To help keep your mom injury-free this summer, here are some tips and gardening equipment ideas that can make gardening a little easier.

Warm Up


With gardening, it is important to maintain good form and not to overdo any one activity. Gardeners often kneel or squat, which puts extra pressure on their knees. Alternatively, standing and bending over for long periods of time to weed, dig and plant can strain the back and spine.

To help your mom protect her body, she needs to warm up before she begins her gardening activities. She should start by stretching, focusing on the legs and lower back. It is also important to keep changing positions and activities. She should not spend hours weeding a flowerbed. After 15 minutes of weeding, she should stand up, stretch and switch to another activity.

It is also important that she recognizes her physical limitations and does not try to do too much all at once. Additionally, when lifting heaver objects, she needs to remember to use her legs to preserve her back. She can do this by keeping the item close to her body and squatting to keep her back as vertical as possible.

Labor-Saving Tools


The right gardening equipment can help too. Kneeling pads can protect knees, and garden seats or stools are both back and knee-savers. Lightweight garden carts can make hauling bags of mulch, dirt, plants or other heavy objects much easier. Long-handled gardening tools can help ease the strain on the back by keeping your mom in an upright standing position versus being bent over. There are also ergonomic gardening tools with thicker handles and other design features that can make lawn and garden activities a little easier.

Easier Watering


The chore of carrying water or handling a heavy, awkward hose can be difficult for older gardeners. Some helpful options include lightweight fabric hoses instead of heavy rubber hoses; soaker or drip hoses that can be snaked throughout the garden; thin coil hoses that can be used on the patio or small areas; a hose caddy and reel for easier hose transport around the yard; or a self-winding hose chest that puts the hose up automatically. There are also a variety of ergonomic watering wands that are lightweight, easy to grip and can reach those hard to-get-to plants.

To find ergonomic gardening tools and the recommended watering aids, check with local retail stores that sell lawn and garden supplies or try online garden retailers.

Container Gardening


If your mom's backyard garden has become too much for her to handle, she should consider elevated garden beds or container gardening, which uses big pots, window boxes, hanging baskets, barrels or tub planters. This is an easier way to garden because it eliminates much of the bending and straining and still allows your mom to plant and grow her plants. Trellises are another nice option that would allow her to plant her garden vertically instead of horizontally.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published May 31, 2019
Print
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Understanding Medicare's Enrollment Periods

What can you tell me about the different enrollment periods for Medicare? I am planning to work past age 65 and understand that Medicare offers Initial, Special and General periods in which I can enroll. How does this work?

The rules for signing up for Medicare can be quite confusing, especially if you plan to work after the age of 65. It is critical to understand the ins and outs of enrolling, because the consequences of missing a deadline can be costly and last a lifetime. Here is what you should know about Medicare's three different enrollment periods.

Initial Enrollment Period


The Initial Enrollment Period, available at age 65, is the first opportunity most people have to enroll in Medicare.

If you are already claiming Social Security benefits at least four months before age 65, you are automatically enrolled in Medicare, with coverage starting the first day of the month you turn 65. If you are not receiving Social Security benefits, it is up to you to enroll in Medicare either online at SSA.gov/Medicare, over the phone at 800-772-1213 or through your local Social Security office.

You can enroll any time during the Initial Enrollment Period, which is a seven-month period that includes the three months prior to, the month of and the three months after your 65th birthday. It is best to enroll three months before your birth month to ensure your coverage starts when you turn 65.

If, however, you plan to keep working and have health coverage through your employer, or your spouse's employer, you may want to delay Medicare Part B, which covers outpatient services, and Part D, which covers prescription drugs. Check with your employer's human resources department to learn how your employer's insurance works with Medicare.

Typically, if your employer has fewer than 20 employees, Medicare will be your primary insurer and you should enroll. If you work for a company that has 20 or more employees, your employer's group health plan will be your primary insurer as long as you remain an active employee. If this is the case, you do not need to enroll in Part B or Part D when you turn 65 if you are satisfied with the coverage you are receiving through your employer. In most cases, unless you are contributing to a Health Savings Account, you should at least sign-up for Medicare Part A, which is free and covers hospital services.

Special Enrollment Period


If you delay Part B and Part D past age 65, you can sign up for Medicare during the Special Enrollment Period. Once you (or your spouse) stop working and you no longer have group health coverage, you have eight months to enroll in Part B. If you miss that deadline, you will pay a late-enrollment penalty for the rest of your life. The penalty increases your premiums by 10% for each 12-month period that you do not have coverage.

The enrollment window for Part D is shorter. You must sign up for Part D within two months of losing drug coverage. If you go 63 days or more without drug coverage, you will pay a lifetime late-enrollment penalty that equals 1% of the monthly base premium (about $33 in 2019) times the number of months you do not have Part D or other creditable coverage.

General Enrollment Period


If you miss either of these first two enrollment periods, you will have to wait until the General Enrollment Period, which is January 1 through March 31 of each year. However, your Part B and Part D coverage will not begin until July 1. You will also be subject to late-enrollment penalties.

There is, however, no penalty for late enrollment for Part A. You can sign up anytime with coverage beginning the first day of the following month.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published May 24, 2019

 Washington County Community Foundation Donors Award over $27K

Grants totaling over $27,000.00 were awarded to several organizations serving Washington County by the generous donors of the Washington County Community Foundation for the Spring 2019 grant cycle.  Grants are awarded from the Foundation’s Touch Tomorrow funds.

Friends of Beck’s Mill has been awarded a $3,000.00 grant to install gates for the parking lots in order to make the landmark safer for guests.

A $2,000.00 grant has been awarded to the Knobstone Hiking Trail Association to build a bridge, install drainage, and post signage for the section of the trail that passes through the Buffalo Bottoms area of the county.

Choices Life Resource Center has been awarded a grant in the amount of $2070.00 to update the Parent Program curriculum to teach parenting and life-skills which are offered free of charge to families.

A $3000.00 grant has been awarded to Jump Start to provide back-to-school supplies to students in need.

Washington County Senior Citizen Housing has been awarded a $6200.00 grant to assist with a grant writer in preparation to obtain a much larger grant from the Affordable Housing Program.  The grant will also be used to fund the cost of a capital needs assessment.

The Washington County Food Bank has been awarded a $2800.00 grant to build a roof system over the delivery entrance of the food bank to protect deliveries in inclement weather. 

A $3000.00 grant has been awarded to the City of Salem Parks and Recreation Department to construct two small ridges and a boardwalk across a bike trail so those utilizing the trail can safely cross soft ground. 

Ivy Tech Community College has been awarded a $5000.00 grant so they may offer free basic computer classes at the Community Learning Center one a month for a year.  Each course will be three hours long ad will cover a variety of topics such as Microsoft programs, cell phone operating systems, social media, and other technology skills.

Washington County Community Foundation is a nonprofit public charity established in 1993 to serve donors, award grants, and provide leadership to improve Washington County forever

The Long-Term Care Benefit Many Veterans Are Missing Out On

I have heard that the VA has a benefit that can help veterans and their spouses with long-term care costs. We recently had to move my 86-year-old father – who served in the army nearly 60 years ago – into an assisted living facility, and my mom is not far behind. Can the VA help?


The Veterans Administration has a little-known, underutilized benefit that can help wartime veterans and their surviving spouses pay for a variety of long-term care costs.

This benefit, called "Aid and Attendance," is a special pension that is paid in addition to a basic pension. It provides a maximum of $2,230 a month to married veterans, $1,881 a month to single veterans or $1,209 a month to a surviving spouse. The money is tax free and can be used to pay for in-home care, assisted living and nursing home care.

Today, approximately 230,000 veterans and survivors are receiving Aid and Attendance, but millions more are eligible and either do not know about it or do not think they qualify.

Eligibility Requirements


To qualify, your dad must have served at least 90 days of active military service with at least one day of service during a period of war and not have been dishonorably discharged. Single surviving spouses of wartime vets are eligible if their marriage ended when their spouse passed away.

In addition, your dad will have to meet certain thresholds for medical and financial need to be eligible. To qualify medically, he must be either disabled or over the age of 65 and need help with basic everyday living tasks, such as eating, dressing, bathing or going to the bathroom. He may also qualify if he is blind or in a nursing home or assisted living facility due to mental disability. Single surviving spouses have no age restrictions, but they must require help with basic everyday living tasks to be eligible.

To qualify financially, your parents must have limited assets, under $127,061, excluding their home, vehicle and personal belongings. In addition, their annual income (minus medical and long-term care expenses) cannot exceed the Maximum Allowable Pension Rate (MAPR). In 2019, the MAPR is $26,766 for a veteran and his or her spouse, $22,577 for a single veteran or $14,509 for a surviving spouse.

To calculate your parents' income qualifications, add up their income over the past year (including Social Security, pensions, interest income from investments, annuities, etc.), minus any out-of-pocket medical expenses, prescription drugs, insurance premiums and long-term care costs. If the final total is under the MAPR and he meets the other requirements, he should be eligible for aid.

How to Apply


To learn more, or to apply for Aid and Attendance, contact your regional VA benefit office where you can apply in person (see Benefits.va.gov/benefits/offices.asp or call 800–827–1000). You can also apply by writing the Pension Management Center in your state (see Benefits.va.gov/pension/resources-contact.asp). You will need to include evidence, like VA Form 21-2680, which your dad's doctor can fill out to show your dad's need for Aid and Attendance (see VA.gov/vaforms).

If you need some help, you can appoint a Veteran Service Officer (VSO) or a VA-accredited attorney or claims agent to represent your dad. See www.ebenefits.va.gov/ebenefits/vso-search to locate someone.

If your dad is eligible, it will take between six and 12 months for his application to be processed, so be patient.

If your dad's Aid and Attendance application is approved, the VA will send a lump sum retroactive payment covering the time from the day the application was filed until the day it was approved. From that point on, your dad will receive monthly payments going forward.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

2020 Census Offers Temporary Jobs Ideally Suited for Retirees

The U.S. Census Bureau is in the process of recruiting thousands of workers for temporary jobs to help collect valuable data for the 2020 Census, and retirees are ideal candidates. Can you write a column to get the word out? Thanks for your help!

I am happy to oblige, and I agree. This once-in-a-decade job opportunity is a great fit for retirees who have some free time on their hands and would like to earn some extra income while helping their communities.

Attention Retirees!


The United States Census Bureau is currently in the process of recruiting over 500,000 temporary workers to help carry out the upcoming 2020 Census, which is a national headcount of every person living in the U.S.

The U.S Census helps determine each state's representation in Congress; how funds are spent for schools, hospitals and roads; and provides information to guide many decisions made by government agencies, private businesses and institutions.

Jobs within the census vary from working in the field canvassing, updating maps, doing follow-up interviews with citizens in the community, to working in the office as a clerk doing administrative tasks or office operation supervisor who oversees the field staff.

Some jobs will begin this summer, but the majority of positions will begin in late April 2020 and last a month or two.

These temporary part-time positions are located in every county throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Some positions require evening and/or weekend shifts because employees must be available to interview members of the public when they are at home. All positions require several days of online and classroom training. The pay ranges between $13.50 and $30 per hour depending on position and location. To find the pay rates in your area, see 2020census.gov/en/jobs/locations.html.

Job Qualifications


To be able to work for the 2020 Census you must:
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Have a valid Social Security number
  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Have a valid email address
  • Complete an application and answer assessment questions
  • Be registered with the Selective Service System or have a qualifying exemption if you are a male born after Dec. 31, 1959
  • Pass a Census-performed criminal background check and a review of criminal records, including fingerprinting
  • Commit to completing training
  • Be available to work flexible hours, which can include days, evenings and weekends.
In addition, most census jobs require employees to have access to a vehicle and a valid driver's license, unless public transportation is readily available. Access to a computer with an internet connection and an email account are necessary to complete training.

How to Apply


The first step is to complete the online job application at 2020census.gov/en/jobs. The process takes about 30 minutes and will include some assessment questions about your education, work and other experience.

If you are a veteran who would like to claim veterans' preference, which provides preference over nonveteran applicants, you will need supporting documentation.

After you apply, an interviewer will reach out to potential hires to conduct a phone interview, but not all applicants will be interviewed. Job offers are made verbally, but candidates will also receive a letter by email.

For more information on the 2020 Census, or if you have questions or problems with the application process, call 855-562-2020.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published May 10, 2019
Print
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Safe Ways to Get Rid of Expired, Unused Medicine

What is the best and environmentally safe way to dispose of old and unused medications? My mother has a medicine cabinet full of pills, some of which have not been touched in 25 years. I would like to clean it out for her. 


Cleaning out the medicine cabinet is a chore that most people do not think about. It is an important task that can help prevent problems and protect children who may have access to these old, unused drugs. Here are some tips to help clean out your mother's medicine cabinet.

Return Them


Your local pharmacy, hospital, clinic, long-term-care facility or narcotic treatment program might accept your mom's unused medications. Often, there are "collect and destroy" programs that will accept old, unused prescriptions. Search for an authorized facility near you at DisposeMyMeds.org.

You can also drop off her unused medicines at designated police departments, fire stations and other sites on National Prescription Take Back Day, which is held on Saturday, April 27. To find a collection site near you, visit TakeBackDay.dea.gov.

Use a Disposal Kiosk


Many Walgreens and CVS stores have free, anonymous and secure kiosks where you can dispose of medications. Remove your personal information from the package and drop unwanted medication, including opioids, in the slot.

Mail Them


Costco, Rite Aid and CVS pharmacies sell postage-paid envelopes for customers to mail unused prescriptions, including opioids and over-the-counter medications, to a disposal facility.

Throw Them Out


While the above-mentioned options are preferred, you may dispose of them yourself. But do so carefully. The Food and Drug Administration recommends removing the medications from their original package and placing them in a sealable plastic bag with an undesirable substance like coffee grounds, dirt or cat litter. You should then seal the plastic bag and throw it in the trash. This will make the medication less appealing to children, pets or other people who may come in contact with your trash.

For some drugs, such as opioids, the FDA suggests flushing them down the toilet. However, this should only be done as a last resort because trace amounts of flushed drugs can pollute the water supply. To see the FDA list of medications that may be flushed, go to FDA.gov and type "flush list" into the search box.

Another option is to purchase some medication disposal bags, such as the Medsaway Medication Disposal System. Typically, medication disposal bags are carbon pouches that are designed to neutralize all medication including narcotics, liquid medication, transdermal patches and controlled substances. Once the medication is inside the pouch, you will need to add water and place the bag in the trash. You can find medication disposal bags at some local pharmacies or online for approximately $15.

You will also want to remove your mom's personal information from the empty medicine packaging before throwing it away to protect her identity and privacy. If you have other questions about proper drug disposal, talk to her pharmacist.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published May 3, 2019

Tricycles for Grown-Ups

What can you tell me about three-wheeled bicycles? I'm 65 years old and would like to start cycling again but I have some occasional balance problems and do not trust myself on a two-wheeled bicycle. What can you recommend?


Three-wheeled bikes, also known as adult tricycles, are a great cycling option for adults, especially for those who have concerns with their balance or stamina. Here is what you should know, along with some tips to help you shop for one.

Safer Cycling


If you would like to take up or continue bike riding but worry about falling, adult tricycles are a smart option to consider because of the stability they provide. With a tricycle, you can ride as slow as you want without ever losing your balance. You can also put both feet on the ground while seated, which is very reassuring for many older riders.

In addition, adult tricycles are also made with a low "step through" design, making mounting and dismounting easier. These bikes typically come with large tires that ensure a smooth ride, ergonomic handlebars that are easy to reach and grip and oversize seats for comfort and support. Other than the frame, tricycles use the same standard components as traditional bikes, so replacement parts are readily available and repairs are typically not an issue.

There are dozens of types of adult tricycles to choose from, with prices ranging anywhere from a few hundred to several thousand dollars. To help you figure out the type of tricycle that meets your needs and budget, here is a breakdown of the different styles and costs, along with some popular models to check out.

Upright Tricycles


If you are primarily interested in a leisurely ride around the neighborhood for pleasure, fitness or running errands, upright tricycles are a good choice. These are traditional upright-positioned tricycles that come with rear cargo baskets and limited gear options, usually ranging from one to three-speeds.

A great choice in this category is the Sun Traditional Trike that costs between $440 and $550. For a less expensive option, consider the Schwinn Meridian Adult Tricycle which is usually sold for around $300.

Recumbent Tricycles


Recumbent tricycles are the low-to-the-ground, stretched-out frame tricycles that allow you to recline with your legs positioned in front of you. Available in various styles, recumbent tricycles are very comfortable, easy on the back and aerodynamic, which make them ideal for longer rides.

TerraTrikes and Catrike are two of the biggest U.S. companies that make tadpole-style (two wheels are in front) recumbent tricycles. Or, consider Sun Seeker, a company that sells several Delta recumbent tricycles. These tricycles have two wheels in back and typically offer a higher seat level. Be aware that recumbent tricycles are much more expensive, typically ranging between $1,000 and $4,000.

E-Tricycles


If you want a boost from time-to-time, electric tricycles are a great option. These tricycles are hybrids that have pedals and a battery powered electric motor, so you can exercise when you want or, when you need a boost, the motor assist you. Electric Trike offers a variety of options with prices ranging from $1,500 to $3,000. Other brands to consider include Pedego Electric Bikes, ProdecoTech and Evelo.

Folding Tricycles


If you like to travel or if you have limited storage space, tricycles that are designed to fold up to fit in tight spaces are a great solution. The Kent Adult Westport Folding Tricycle and Mantis Tri-Rad Folding Adult Tricycle cost around $300 and are two popular options to check out.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living" book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization's official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Published April 26, 2019
PrintEmail
Subsribe to RSS Feed

Make a Difference
Imagination Library
Youh Foundation
HEAP
Donate Now
education Matters
CF standards
Video Page
Mailing List
FAQ

Washington County
Community Foundation

1707 North Shelby Street
Salem, Indiana 47167
Phone: 812-883-7334
E-Mail: info@wccf.biz

vimeo logo