Hearing Loss Help

 

Can you direct me to some resources for my hearing impaired mother? She doesn't realize her hearing has gotten as bad as it has, so I'm looking for some affordable ways to help. Any suggestions?

There are more 31.5 million Americans today that have hearing loss (two-thirds of which are over age 55) but less than half ever seek treatment. Here are some tips that may help.

Hearing Loss


Being aware of hearing loss as you grow older is important because impaired hearing can have a negative impact on your quality of life. In fact, studies show that older people with hearing impairment often withdraw, become depressed and may even die before their time. Because hearing loss usually develops over years, many people aren't aware of the extent of their loss until family or friends bring it to their attention. Here's a simple test to help your mom see where she stands:
  • Does she have trouble hearing over the telephone?
  • Does she listen to TV at a high volume level?
  • Does she frequently have to ask others to repeat themselves?
  • Does she have difficulty understanding people in groups or noisy situations?
  • Does she have difficulty understanding women or young children?
  • Does she have trouble knowing where sounds are coming from?
  • Is she unable to understand when someone talks to her from another room?
  • Does she avoid family meetings or social situations because she "can't understand"?
If she answered yes to three or more of these questions she may have a hearing problem and should see an otolaryngologist, a doctor who specializes in ear, nose and throat disorders (see www.entnet.org to locate one in your area), or an audiologist (www.audiology.org) for a hearing evaluation.

Hearing Solutions


Depending on her hearing problem there are various devices or treatments that can help. Some possible solutions include:
  • Hearing Aids: Recent advances in design and technology have dramatically improved hearing aids over the past few years. She should work with an audiologist to find the right kind. Also, ask about having a trial period so she can try out several different aids. Costs typically range between $800 and $3,000 per ear. Medicare doesn't cover hearing aids nor do most health insurers. For more information on the different kinds of hearing aids, models and new technology visit www.hearingloss.org and order the "Consumer's Guide to Hearing Aids."
  • Assistive Devices: These are products that can help with less than perfect hearing, such as telephone amplifying devices, TV and radio listening systems, assistive listening devices or alert products like flashing light door bells, smoke detectors, etc. A good place to locate these types of products is at www.abledata.com.
  • Cochlear implants: If hearing loss is severe, cochlear implant surgery may provide a possible solution. Ask her doctor about this option.

Discount Hearing Aids


For the millions of Americans that need hearing aids but can't afford them, there's a great program that can help called "Audient." It is a relatively new non-profit service that helps people purchase new hearing aids at greatly discounted prices. To be eligible, your income must be no higher than two-and-a-half times the national poverty level - $24,500 for an individual, plus $8,500 for each additional family member. No asset test is required and financing plans are also available. If eligible, you'll receive an examination by a hearing health professional (within their nationwide network), and then be fitted with new digital, behind-the-ear hearing aids. Routine follow-up visits are also provided. Discounts range between 30% and 75%. To learn more visit www.audientalliance.org or call 877-283-4368.

Savvy Tips: Many states have a telecommunications equipment distribution program that provides free telephone equipment to assist people with their hearing problem. Check with your local telephone company or visit www.tedpa.org to find what's available in your state. And a great resource for hearing loss information is the Better Hearing Institute, which also offers a free booklet titled "Your Guide to Better Hearing." To get a copy, visit www.betterhearing.org or call 800-327-9355.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

 

Published April 28, 2017

How Medicare Covers Therapy Services

 

Can you explain how Medicare covers physical therapy services? I'm a new beneficiary and would like to get some treatments for my back.
Medicare covers a variety of outpatient therapy services, including physical, occupational and speech therapy. In order to receive coverage, you must meet certain criteria. Here's how it works.

Medicare Coverage

In order for Medicare (Part B) to help cover your physical therapy, the therapy must be considered medically reasonable and necessary and will need to be ordered or prescribed by your doctor.
Medicare will cover services that are performed at outpatient facilities, including doctors' offices, therapists' offices, rehabilitation facilities, medical clinics and hospital outpatient departments.
You also need to know that Medicare limits the amount of coverage that it will provide for outpatient therapy services in one calendar year. These limits are called "therapy cap limits." In 2017, Medicare will cover up to $1,980 for physical and speech therapy combined and another $1,980 for occupational therapy.
Be aware that just like other Medicare covered services, Medicare will pay 80% (up to $1,584) of your therapy costs after you meet your $183 Part B deductible. You, or your Medicare supplemental plan (if you have one), will be responsible for the remaining 20% until the cap limits are reached. After that, you'll have to pay the full cost for the services.

Extra Therapy

If, however, you reach your cap limits and your doctor or therapist recommends that you continue with the treatment, you can ask your therapist to provide documentation so that you can receive an exception that will enable Medicare to continue to pay for your therapy. The therapist must provide documentation indicating that these services are medically necessary for you to continue. If Medicare denies the claim, you can appeal through the Medicare appeals process (see Medicare.gov/claims-and-appeals).
If approved, Medicare has an exception threshold of $3,700 for physical and speech therapy combined and $3,700 for occupational therapy. If your therapy cost exceeds these thresholds, Medicare will audit your case, which could lead to denial of further services.

No Coverage

If you choose to receive physical therapy that's not considered medically necessary or prescribed by your doctor, your therapist is required to give you a written document called an "Advance Beneficiary Notice of Noncoverage" (ABN). Medicare Part B will not pay for these services.

Therapy at Home

You should also know that Medicare covers home therapy services too. In order to receive these services, you must be homebound and eligible to receive home health care from a Medicare-approved home healthcare agency. To learn more about this option, see the "Medicare and Home Health Care" online booklet at Medicare.gov/pubs/pdf/10969.pdf.

Medicare Advantage

If you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan (like an HMO or PPO), these plans must cover everything that's included in original Medicare Part A and Part B coverage. Sometimes these plans cover more, with extra services or an expanded amount of coverage. To find out whether your plan provides extra coverage or requires different co-payments for physical therapy, you'll need to contact the plan directly.

More Information

If you have other questions, call Medicare at 800-633-4227 or contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), which provides free Medicare counseling in person or over the phone. To find a local SHIP counselor visit Shiptacenter.org, or call the eldercare locator at 800-677-1116.
Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.
Published April 21, 2017

Coping with Ringing in Your Ears

 

Are there any new treatments you know of that can help with constant ear ringing syndrome known as tinnitus? I've had it for years but it has gotten worse the older I get.
Tinnitus is a common condition that affects around 45 million Americans, but it is usually more prevalent in the 60-and-older age group. Here's what you should know along with some tips and treatments that may help.

What is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus (pronounced tin-NIGHT-us or TIN-a-tus) is the sensation of hearing a ringing, buzzing, roaring, hissing or whistling sound in one or both ears when no external sound is present. The sounds, which can vary in pitch and loudness, are usually worse when background noise is low, so you may be more aware of it at night when you're trying to fall asleep in a quiet room. For most people, tinnitus is merely annoying, but for many others it can be extremely disturbing.
Tinnitus itself is not a disease, but rather a symptom of some other underlying health condition. The best way to find out what's causing your tinnitus is to see an audiologist, or an otolaryngologist – a doctor who specializes in ear, nose and throat diseases (commonly called and ENT). The various things that can cause tinnitus are:
  • Age-related and noise-induced hearing loss – this is most common cause.
  • Middle ear obstructions, which are usually caused by a build-up of earwax deep in the ear canal.
  • The side effects of many different prescription and nonprescription medicines like aspirin, ibuprofen, certain blood pressure medicines and diuretics, some antidepressants, cancer medicines and antibiotics.
  • Various medical conditions such as high blood pressure, vascular disease, diabetes, allergies, thyroid problems, ear or sinus infections, Meniere's disease, Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, otosclerosis, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder, a tumor, an injury to the head or neck, traumatic brain injury, depression, stress and more.

Treating the Causes

While there's currently no cure for tinnitus, there are some ways to treat it depending on the cause. For example, if your tinnitus is caused by a wax build-up in your ears or a medical condition (high blood pressure, thyroid problem, etc.), treating the problem may reduce or eliminate the noise. Or, if you think a medication you're taking may be causing the problem, switching to a different drug, or lowering the dosage, may provide some relief.

Other Treatments

Another treatment option for tinnitus that can help suppress or mask the sound so it's less bothersome is "sound therapy." This can be as simple as a fan or a white noise machine or something more sophisticated like a modified-sound or notched-music device like Neuromonics (neuromonics.com) or the Levo System (otoharmonics.com). These devices actually train your brain not to hear the tinnitus.
If you have hearing loss, hearing aids can help mask your tinnitus by improving your ability to hear actual sounds. There are even hearing aids today that come with integrated sound generation technology that delivers white noise or customized sounds to the patient on an ongoing basis. Your audiologist or ENT can help you with these options.
There are also certain medications that may help. While currently there's no FDA approved drugs specifically designed to treat tinnitus, some antianxiety drugs and antidepressants have been effective in reliving symptoms. Behavioral therapies, counseling and support groups can also be helpful.
Another thing you can do to help quiet the noise is to avoid things that can aggravate the problem like salt, artificial sweeteners, sugar, alcohol, tonic water, tobacco and caffeine. It is also a good idea to protect yourself from loud noises by wearing earplugs.
For more information on tinnitus treatment options, visit the American Tinnitus Association at ata.org.
Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.
Published April 14, 2017

How Working during Retirement Can Affect Your Social Security Benefits

I'm considering retiring later this year and starting my Social Security benefits, but I would also like to work part time. Will this affect my benefits and, if so, how much?


You can collect Social Security retirement benefits and work at the same time, but depending on how old you are and how much you earn, some or all of your benefits could be temporarily withheld. Here's what you should know.

Working Rules


If you're under your full retirement age and are collecting benefits, then you can earn up to $16,920 in 2017 without jeopardizing any of your Social Security if you don't reach your full retirement age this year. But, if you earn more than the $16,920 limit, you'll lose $1 in benefits for every $2 over that amount. Note that if you were born between 1943 and 1954, then your full retirement age is 66. If you were born in 1955 or later, then your full retirement age is 66 and two months.

In the year you reach your full retirement age, a less stringent rule applies. If you reach your full retirement age in 2017, you can earn up to $44,880 from January to the month of your birthday with no penalty. But if you earn more than $44,880 during that time, you'll lose $1 in benefits for every $3 over that limit. And, once your birthday passes, you can earn any amount by working without your benefits being reduced at all.

Wages, bonuses, commissions and vacation pay all count toward the income limits, but pensions, annuities, investment earnings, interest, capital gains and government or military retirement benefits do not. To figure out how much your specific earnings will affect your benefits, see the Social Security Retirement Earnings Test Calculator at SSA.gov/OACT/COLA/RTeffect.html.

It's also important to know that if you do lose some or all of your Social Security benefits because of the earning limits, the benefits will not be lost forever. When you reach full retirement age, your benefits will be recalculated to a higher amount to make up for what was withheld. For details and examples of how this is calculated, see SSA.gov/planners/retire/whileworking2.html.

For more information on how working can affect your Social Security benefits see SSA.gov/planners/retire/whileworking.html, or call the Social Security Administration at 410-965-2039 and ask to receive a free copy of publication number 05-10069, "How Work Affects Your Benefits."

Tax Factor


In addition to the Social Security rules, you need to factor in Uncle Sam too. Because working increases your income, it might make your Social Security benefits taxable.

Here's how it works. If the sum of your adjusted gross income, nontaxable interest and half of your Social Security benefits is between $25,000 and $34,000 for individuals ($32,000 and $44,000 for couples), you have to pay tax on up to 50% of your benefits. If the sum is above $34,000 ($44,000 for couples), then you could pay tax on up to 85% of your benefits, which is the highest portion of Social Security that is taxable. About a third of all people who get Social Security have to pay income taxes on their benefits.

For information, call the IRS at 800-829-3676 and ask them to mail you a free copy of Publication 915, "Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits." Alternatively, you can access it online at IRS.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p915.pdf.

In addition to the federal government, 13 states - Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia - tax Social Security benefits to some extent too. If you live in one of these states, you'll need to check with your state tax agency for details.

Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

 

Published April 7, 2017
 

How to Pick a Medical Alert System

How to Pick a Medical Alert System

I would like to get my 82-year-old mother, who lives alone, a home medical alert system with a panic button that she can push in case she falls or needs help. Can you recommend some good options to help me choose?
A good medical alert system is an affordable and effective tool that can help keep your mother safe, but with all the choices available today, choosing one can be quite confusing. Here are some tips that can help.

How They Work

Medical alert systems, which have been around for about 40 years, are popular products for seniors who live alone. Leased for about $1 a day, these basic systems provide a wearable help button - usually in the form of a neck pendant or wristband - and a base station that connects to the home phone line or to a cellular network if no landline is present.
At the press of a button, your mom could call and talk to a trained operator through the system's base station receiver, which works like a powerful speakerphone. The operator will find out what's wrong and notify family members, friends, neighbors or emergency services as needed.
In addition to the basic home systems, many companies today (for an additional fee) are also offering motion sensitive pendants that can detect a fall and automatically call for help if your mom is unable to push the button. Some companies also offer mobile medical alerts that work when your mom is away from home. These mobile alerts work like cell phones with GPS tracking capabilities. They allow your mom to talk and listen to the operator directly through the pendant button and, because of the GPS, her general location would be known in order for help to be sent.

What to Consider

When shopping for a home medical alert system, here are some things to look for to help you choose a quality system:
  • Extra help buttons: Most companies offer waterproof neck pendant and wristband help buttons, but some also offer wall-mounted buttons that can be placed near the floor in high fall risk areas like the bathroom or kitchen, in case your mom isn't wearing her pendant.
  • Range: The base station should have a range of at least 400 feet so it can be activated from anywhere on your mom's property - even in the yard.
  • Backup: Make sure the system has a battery backup in case of a power failure.
  • Monitoring: Make sure the response center is staffed with trained emergency operators located in the U.S., available on a 24-hour basis and responds to calls promptly.
  • Contacts: Choose a company that provides multiple contact choices - from emergency services to a friend or family member who lives nearby - that they can contact if your mom needs help.
  • Certification: Find out if the monitoring center has been certified by Underwriters Laboratories, a nonprofit safety and consulting company.

Available Companies

While there are dozens of companies that offer medical alert systems, here are some options that offer both home and mobile alerts. Fees usually start at about $30 per month. Bay Alarm Medical, bayalarmmedical.com, Life Station, lifestation.com, Medical Alert, medicalalert.com and MobileHelp, mobilehelpnow.com.
Most of these companies offer discounts if you pay three to twelve months in advance.
Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.
Published March 31, 2017

Youth Foundation Now Recruiting

The Washington County Youth Foundation is now recruiting new members for the 2017-2018 school year. The Youth Foundation is a group of students from Washington County committed to making our community a better place to live.  The board has members who are sophomores, juniors and seniors in any area high school or are home schooled. 

The Youth Foundation averages one meeting a month. Times and location will vary; however, most meetings occur on Sunday afternoons.  During the school year the Washington County Youth Foundation will offer one grant cycle, several community service activities and one peer community awareness/asset development event.  Also, Washington County Youth Foundation members will be expected to be volunteers in the Happily Ever After Project.  All members make financial contributions to support the service activities of the Youth Foundation.  

Application, permission slip and more information can be downloaded from the Washington County Community Foundation’s website at www.wccf.biz.  Additionally, informational flyers can be obtained from current Washington County Youth Foundation members or by calling the Foundation office at 883-7334.   Applications are due by 4:00 pm on April 15, 2017.

Washington County Community Foundation is a nonprofit public charity established in 1993 to serve donors, award grants, and provide leadership to improve Washington County forever

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Services That Can Help Seniors with the Rigors of Travel

 

Do you know of any services that help seniors with the rigors of traveling? My youngest daughter is getting married in a few months and would love to have my 82-year old mother attend, but she needs help flying across the country.
Traveling can be daunting under the best circumstances, but for elderly seniors, those with disabilities or those recovering from an illness or injury, it can seem particularly overwhelming and unmanageable. Fortunately, there are a number of companies that provide travel companions to assist these individuals with the rigors of travel.
Whether the individual needing assistance is someone who has a physical disability and wants to go on a vacation or is a grandparent who wants to attend a family member's wedding or graduation, travel companions help their clients move through airports, manage luggage, navigate busy terminals and hotel lobbies and much more.
Some companion services even provide personal care like medication reminders, dressing, bathing and feeding. Additionally, there are also traveling nursing services for those with specific medical needs.
Be aware that these services aren't cheap. You will pay for the travel companion's tickets, a fee for the services and, if necessary, the companion's hotel room, meals and incidentals. The price to accompany a client on a plane trip within the United States - including the companion fees and travel costs for all parties - can range anywhere from $1,500 to $5,000 or more for coach airfare. Business or first class would cost more.
To locate a travel companion service in your area, search online for "senior travel companion" or "senior travel escort," followed by the appropriate city or state. Another option is to use an experienced national service, like Flying Companions (FlyingCompanions.com) or FirstLight Home Care (FirstLightHomeCare.com), which operates a national network of franchises that provide in-home care for seniors and offers travel companion programs in about one-third of its 130 franchises.
If a medical travel companion is needed, you can search online for "traveling nurse companion" or "medical travel companion," or checkout Travel Care & Logistics (YourFlightNurse.com), which provides registered nurses who provide travel assistance.
If, however, the individual does not require a lot of assistance, or cannot afford a travel companion, consider asking a trusted family member or friend who has air travel experience to accompany the individual on his or her trip.

Questions to Ask

If you're interested in hiring a travel companion service, there are a number of things you need to check into to ensure you get the right travel companion.
First, if personal or medical care is required while traveling, find out if the travel companion is trained to manage healthcare needs. Ask what type of medical certifications he or she has (e.g., nursing credentials, C.P.R. training, etc.).
Next, you will want to find out how many trips the companion has taken with clients. Has he or she completed trips with similar clients/travelers? How long has the travel service company been in business? What is the company's safety record? What type of insurance does it carry and what/who does it cover?
Also, ask for a quote that breaks down exactly what you'll be required to pay, in addition to the companion's fees. Lastly, request a list of two or three clients/references who have used the service and call them to find out if they would recommend the service.
Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

Wal-Mart Gives Away Free Books to Local Students

Just in time for Spring Break, our local Wal-Mart store gave away almost 600 books to local second and third grade students. Why?  Because Wal-Mart is supporting the Happily Ever After Project, which was started by the Washington County Youth Foundation in 2010.

“We love partnering with Washington County Community Foundation especially on this project because we feel passionately about reading. In our age of technology, the ability to read is still the foundation of a lifetime of learning,” stated Mike King, Salem Wal-Mart Store Manager.

King went on to say, “I love kids and I really enjoyed visiting the classroom and reading to Ms. Johnson’s class. They still have what we all should never lose:  The belief that you can do anything.  Being able to read is the key to open every door and achieving any goal you set.”

Members of the Washington County Youth Foundation started the Happily Ever After Project to promote a love of reading in every child’s life. Since 2010, with the help of generous sponsors like Wal-Mart, they have given away almost 12,000 books to local elementary students.

Additionally, the Washington County Community Foundation started the Dolly Parton Imagination Library in 2015. Through this program, children in Washington County from birth to age five can register FREE and receive an age appropriate book mailed to their home every month.  This service has over 900 children registered in our community. 

Programs like these happen because of generous donors. Individuals, businesses and organizations all working together are supporting the Happily Ever After Project and the Dolly Parton Imagination Library and teaching our very young children to learn to love to read.

If you would like to support these programs, contact the Washington County Community Foundation at 883-7334 or director@wccf.biz.  For just $26.00 a year (Fifty cents a week), you can sponsor a child in the Dolly Parton Imagination Library for an entire year.  Contact the Foundation to learn more.

The mission of the Washington County Community Foundation is to engage people, build resources and strengthen our community. Visit the website at www.wccf.biz and like the Foundation on Facebook. 

How To Stop Snoring

 

Over the past few years my 57-year-old husband's snoring has gotten much worse. It's to the point that I have to either wear earplugs or move to a different room. Any suggestions?
Snoring is a very common problem that often gets worse with age. Around 37 million Americans snore on a regular basis according to the National Sleep Center.
Snoring occurs when the airway narrows or is partly blocked during sleep usually due to nasal congestion, floppy tissue, alcohol, or enlarged tonsils. But you and your husband also need to know that snoring can be much more than just an annoyance. It can also be a red flag for obstructive sleep apnea, a serious condition in which the snorer stops and starts breathing during sleep, increasing the risks of cardiovascular disease, stroke, cardiac arrhythmia and hypertension. According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 34% of men and 19% of women who snore routinely have sleep apnea or are at risk for it.

Self-Help Remedies

Even if you are unsure whether your husband has a primary snoring problem or sleep apnea, sleep experts suggest you start with these steps.
Open a stuffy nose: If nasal congestion is causing your husband to snore, over-the-counter nasal strips such as Breathe Right may help. Or, if allergies are the cause, try saline nasal sprays.
Elevate his head: Buying a foam wedge to elevate his head a few inches can help reduce snoring. In the alternative, consider buying him a contoured pillow to lift his chin and keep the tongue from blocking the back of his throat as he sleeps. Also check out Nora (smartnora.com), a wireless snoring device that slides under the pillow and gently moves the head to a different position when snoring is detected. This, they say, stimulates the relaxed throat muscles and opens the airway.
Sleep on side: To prevent back sleeping, which triggers snoring, place a pillow against your husband's back to keep him from rolling over or sew a tennis ball in the back of his pajama shirt. Or check out the Night Shift Sleep Positioner (nightshifttherapy.com), a device that's worn around the neck that vibrates when you roll on your back.
Avoid alcohol before bed: Alcoholic beverages can relax the muscles in the throat and constrict airflow. He should not consume alcohol three to four hours before bedtime.
Lose excess weight: Fat around the neck can compress the upper airway and impede airflow and is often associated with sleep apnea.
Quit smoking: Smoking causes inflammation in the upper airways that can make snoring worse.

Need More Help?

If these lifestyle strategies don't make a big difference, your husband should see his doctor, a sleep specialist or an otolaryngologist who may recommend an overnight study to test him for apnea.
For primary snoring or mild to moderate sleep apnea, an oral appliance that fits into the mouth like a retainer may be prescribed. This shifts the lower jaw and tongue forward, keeping the airway open.
Some other options are Theravent snore therapy (theraventsnoring.com) and Provent sleep apnea therapy (proventtherapy.com), which are small nasal devices that attach over the nostrils to improve airflow.
But the gold standard for moderate to severe sleep apnea is a continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, device. This involves sleeping with a mask that is hooked up to a machine that gently blows air up your nose to keep the passages open.
If these don't work or are intolerable, surgery is an option too. There are procedures available today that remove excess tissue in the nose, mouth or throat. And a newer procedure called hypoglossal nerve stimulation uses a small device implanted in the chest to help control the movement of the tongue when it blocks the airway.
Savvy Living is written by Jim Miller, a regular contributor to the NBC Today Show and author of "The Savvy Living” book. Any links in this article are offered as a service and there is no endorsement of any product. These articles are offered as a helpful and informative service to our friends and may not always reflect this organization’s official position on some topics. Jim invites you to send your senior questions to: Savvy Living, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070.

How Would You Like to Send Your Child to College for Free?

Washington County Community Foundation is offering incentives through county middle schools for students that apply for the 21st Century Scholar Program.

Indiana’s 21st Century Scholars Program began in 1990 to ensure that every Hoosier student can afford the opportunity provided by a college degree. Today, eligible students who keep the Scholar Pledge to excellence in school and life receive a Scholarship to help pay for their college education.

Indiana’s 21st Century Scholars Program offers income-eligible Hoosier students up to four years of paid tuition at an eligible Indiana college or university after they graduate from high school. In middle and high school, 21st Century Scholars are connected to programs and resources to help them plan, prepare, and pay for college. Once in college, Scholars receive support to complete their college degrees and connect to career opportunities.

7th and 8th grade Indiana students whose families meet income eligibility guidelines can apply to become a 21st Century Scholar. Applications must be received by June 30 of the student’s 8th grade year. Students may apply online, or through a local school or nonprofit organization that has agreed to submit online applications on behalf of eligible students. To enroll your student, visit www.in.gov/21stcenturyscholars.  School counselors also have more information about the program and the application incentives sponsored by Washington County Community Foundation.

Washington County Community Foundation is a nonprofit public charity established in 1993 to serve donors, award grants, and provide leadership to improve Washington County forever

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